Disney is ditching Netflix in 2019 to launch its own streaming service

Greg Kumparak, writing for TechCrunch;

Disney has just announced plans to end its distribution agreement with Netflix in 2019, instead opting to launch its own streaming service sometime during that same year.

Here’s the part of their announcement that mentioned that they will exit Netflix;

The new Disney-branded service will become the exclusive home in the U.S. for subscription-video-on-demand viewing of the newest live action and animated movies from Disney and Pixar, beginning with the 2019 theatrical slate, which includes Toy Story 4, the sequel to Frozen, and The Lion King from Disney live-action, along with other highly anticipated movies. Disney will also make a significant investment in an annual slate of original movies, TV shows, short-form content and other Disney-branded exclusives for the service. Additionally, the service will feature a vast collection of library content, including Disney and Pixar movies and Disney Channel, Disney Junior and Disney XD television programming.

With this strategic shift, Disney will end its distribution agreement with Netflix for subscription streaming of new releases, beginning with the 2019 calendar year theatrical slate.

Considering the size of their catalog, this will be a big blow for Netflix, we can just assume that Netflix executives are already anticipating this and they’re just wondering when it will happen.

iflix raises over US$90M to be the Netflix of Asia, Middle East and Africa

Yon Heong Tung, reporting for E27;

Kuala Lumpur-based Internet TV service iflix has raised over US$90 million from Liberty Global, an international TV and broadband company; Zain, a Middle Eastern and Africa telco; and a private consumer business investment management firm in Africa.

iflix had partnered with Zain last month to launch ‘iflix Arabia’ in the MENA region.

iflix appears to be expanding to market where Netflix has little or no presence at all.

ComClark beats PLDT in Netflix ISP Speed Index for the Philippines

The Netflix ISP Speed Index is a measure of prime time Netflix performance on particular ISPs (internet service providers) around the globe, and not a measure of overall performance for other services/data that may travel across the specific ISP network.

The difference between PLDT and ComClark is only 0.21 mbps, which is not that much when you think about the area that is being serve by PLDT compare to ComClark.

Also, I may be wrong about this but as far as I know Comclark is piggy backing on PLDT for its connectivity, since Comclark used to be PLDT Clark a number of years ago.